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ENGL 40001-50501 Teaching Writing

Subject Guide

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Sarah Wagner
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Getting Started in the Library

This library guide points you in the direction of some basic library resources for completing library assignments and writing research papers in this course. Many of these resources are available from the library's homepage at http://www.library.pfw.edu/, so you may want to bookmark both the homepage and this guide.

Finding Books and Media

Library Search interface

Use Library Search to find books, periodicals (scholarly journals, popular magazines, newspapers, and other serials), or  other library materials such as music CDs, electronic resources, and videos. Books, printed periodicals, and other library materials are shelved in call number order.


A-N = 3rd Floor   |  P-Z = 4th Floor   |   Reference = 1st Floor

 

Looking for something not in Library Search?  Try Worldcat linked below.

OCLC Worldcat Logo

When you do not find enough information via the library catalog, try using the WorldCat catalog. WorldCat is a worldwide library catalog containing records from most academic and larger public libraries worldwide. You can use the "Request Item through Document Delivery" button to order materials that are not available at the Purdue Fort Wayne library.

Databases for this Course

The most efficient way of finding a high-quality periodical article , is to search a periodical database or index that provides descriptive abstracts, subject indexing, and often, the full-text content of articles. Below is a selection of databases useful for your course.

Library Tools and Databases for Students in Introductory English Composition Courses

Is Your Article Scholarly or Popular?

University instructors often ask students to use articles from scholarly journals rather than from popular magazines for their research assignments. The following Is Your Journal Scholarly? (PDF) summarizes major differences between scholarly journals, trade and popular magazines. Which type of source have you located?

Finding Internet Sites for this Course

Several specific Web sites which may be useful are:

CompPile which provides access to a bibliography of journal articles, review essays, notes and comments, books and edited collections in post-secondary composition, rhetoric, ESL, discourse studies and technical writing published between 1939 and 1999.

Computers and Composition Online, which is the refereed online companion journal to Computers and Composition: An International Journal. States its goal as being " ...a significant resource for scholar-teachers interested in the impact of new and emerging media upon the teaching of language and literacy in both virtual and face-to-face forums."

National Council of Teachers of English This association's website provides links to useful publications and teacher resources.

EServer TC Library presents "...a comprehensive single location from which to access the best resources currently available online" for professional, scientific, and technical communicators. Useful to students, teachers and managers alike.

Style Guides for this Course

The most frequently recommended style guides in the humanities include the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers or the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (both official Modern Language Association guides). The Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL) also has a helpful site for using MLA style: Purdue OWL: MLA Formatting and Style Guide